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effects_of_family_structure_on_the_economy [2017/09/15 10:56]
marri [2. Re-Marriage]
effects_of_family_structure_on_the_economy [2017/09/15 11:16]
marri [4. Cohabitation]
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 //(See [[effects.of.divorce.on.financial.stability|Effects of Divorce on Financial Stability]])//​ //(See [[effects.of.divorce.on.financial.stability|Effects of Divorce on Financial Stability]])//​
  
-Following a divorce, both spouses’ net worth decreases. Many women also sustain substantial income losses and are forced into poverty, particularly if the couple has any children. If they do, women frequently must care for them financially or developmentally on their own, which also depresses their economic well-being. Even among women who receive child support, many custodial mothers are impoverished. Divorce severely diminishes child economic well-being, particularly child economic mobility.+Following a divorce, both spouses’ net worth decreases.((Jay L. Zagorsky, “Marriage and Divorce’s Impact on Wealth,” //Journal of Sociology// 41, no. 4 (2005).)) ​Many women also sustain substantial income losses and are forced into poverty, particularly if the couple has any children.((Thomas L. Hanson, Sara S. McLanahan, and Elizabeth Thomson, “Windows on Divorce: Before and After,” //Social Science Research// 27, (1998).)) ​If they do, women frequently must care for them financially or developmentally on their own, which also depresses their economic well-being. Even among women who receive child support, many custodial mothers are impoverished. Divorce severely diminishes child economic well-being, particularly child economic mobility.((Thomas DeLeire and Leonard M. Lopoo, “Family Structure and the Economic Mobility of Children,​” //Economic Mobility Project// (2010). Available at [[http://​www.economicmobility.org/​assets/​pdfs/​Family_Structure.pdf]],​ 14 March 2011, 15.  
 +Kenneth A. Couch and Dean R. Lillard, “Divorce, Educational Attainment, and the Earnings Mobility of Sons,” //Journal of Family and Economic Issues// 18, no. 3 (1997): 241.))
  
 =====4. Cohabitation===== =====4. Cohabitation=====
 //(See [[effects.of.cohabitation.on.financial.stability|Effects of Cohabitation on Financial Stability]])//​ //(See [[effects.of.cohabitation.on.financial.stability|Effects of Cohabitation on Financial Stability]])//​
  
-Cohabiting relationships are frequently unstable and of [[cohabitation.and.future.marital.stability|short duration]]. Cohabitation produces weaker economic outcomes than marriage, according to all economic metrics examined. Cohabiting men have less stable employment histories than married men, and cohabiting couples earn less and are less likely to pool their incomes than married households. They also have low net worth and low net worth growth, are more likely to be poor, and create a less stable environment for children, compared to married households.+Cohabiting relationships are frequently unstable and of [[cohabitation.and.future.marital.stability|short duration]]. Cohabitation produces weaker economic outcomes than marriage, according to all economic metrics examined.((Patrick F Fagan, Andrew J. Kidd, and Henry Potrykus, "​Marriage and Economic Well-Being: The Economy of the Family Rises or Falls with Marriage",​ Marriage and Religion Research Institute (2004).)) ​Cohabiting men have less stable employment histories than married men,((B.V. Brown, “The Single-Father Family: Demographic,​ Economic, and Public Transfer Use Characteristics,​” //Marriage and Family Review// 29, (2000).)) ​and cohabiting couples earn less and are less likely to pool their incomes than married households.((Kristen R. Heimdal and Sharon K. Houseknecht,​ “Cohabiting and Married Couples’ Income Organization:​ Approaches in Sweden and the United States,” //Journal of Marriage and Family// 65, no. 3 (2003).)) ​They also have low net worth and low net worth growth,((Julie Zissimopoulos,​ “Gain and Loss: Marriage and Wealth Changes over Time,” Michigan Retirement Research Center, Working Paper (2009).)) ​are more likely to be poor, and create a less stable environment for children, compared to married households.((Adam Thomas and Isabel Sawhill, “For Love and Money? The Impact of Family Structure on Family Income,” //The Future of Children// 15, no. 2, (2005). 
 +Peter D. Brandon and Larry Bumpass, “Children’s Living Arrangements,​ Coresidence of Unmarried Fathers, and Welfare Receipt,” //Journal of Family Issues// 22, (2001).  
 +Wendy D. Manning and Daniel T. Lichter, “Parental Cohabitation and Children'​s Economic Well-Being,​” //Journal of Marriage and the Family// 58, (1996).))
  
 =====5. Single Parenthood===== =====5. Single Parenthood=====